Jump up ^ Muller Weitzenhoffer, André (1989). "Chapter 8 Ericksonian Hypnotism: The Bandler/Grinder Interpretation". The Practice of Hypnotism Volume 2: Applications of Traditional an Semi-Traditional Hypnotism. Non-Traditional Hypnotism (1st ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. p. 306. ISBN 0-471-62168-4. This work [TRANCE-Formation], incidentally, contains some glaring misstatements of facts. For example, Freud and Mesmer were depicted as contemporaries!
The second induction involves moving the student's arm up, down, left and right, and as I do this I break the pattern from time to time and also add in 'deeper' on some of the down movements. I break the pattern because I am saying out loud what I am doing, but mismatching what I am saying and what I am doing at times. This is also quite a quick induction to do. The induction interrupts the pattern and also creates confusion as well as focusing and guiding attention and involving movement and touch. The second induction took place about ten minutes after the end of the first induction.
In hypnosis, patients typically see practitioners by themselves for a course of hourly or half-hourly treatments. Some general practitioners and other medical specialists use hypnosis as part of their regular clinical work and follow a longer initial consultation with standard 10- to 15-minute appointments. Patients can be given a post-hypnotic suggestion that enables them to induce self-hypnosis after the treatment course is completed. Some practitioners undertake group hypnosis, treating up to a dozen patients at a time—for example, teaching self-hypnosis to prenatal groups as preparation for labor.
You may also be interested in reading this old post that we wrote a while back about Core Conversational Hypnosis skills here, http://hypnosistrainingacademy.com/core-conversational-hypnosis-skills/ . Take your time Kattie, with practice and perseverance you WILL definitely be able to feel more and more comfortable to perform these two skills. There is no rush! Best wishes for your future practice, and thanks for writing in.
Contrary to popular belief, humans stay completely awake during hypnosis. In fact, the average person enters a hypnotic state twice a day without even realizing it. Hypnosis can be used to ease pain, treat autoimmune disease, block memories and break bad habits. But not everyone is capable of being hypnotized.  Is it ethical and useful to hypnotize children? And what are the downsides and dangers of hypnosis? A growing body of research on hypnosis seeks to answer these questions.

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NLP Trainers train NLP Practitioners as well as NLP Master Practitioners. This program enables discovery of your unique identity as a trainer and as a presenter, which is what makes a difference. A person learns how to be confident, which allows them to have fun and be at ease in front of people. This training prepares you to become a charismatic and transformational presenter. It delivers skills and techniques to successfully influence groups, to understand, analyze and coordinate group processes, and also the mastery of skills to be a charismatic presenter. Upon completion, a person is able to present in front of groups of any size with perfect confidence.
Jump up ^ Grinder, John; Bostic St. Clair (2001). "Chapter 3: The New Code". Whispering In The Wind. J & C Enterprises. p. 174. ISBN 0-9717223-0-7. Triple Description also owes much to Castaneda's definition of a warrior as a person who collects multiple descriptions of the world (without any movement to resolve the question of which of these descriptions represents reality).
Carol Sommer is a licensed clinical counselor who has been teaching clinical hypnotherapy since 1984. She is a certified Hypnotherapist and Consultant with American Society of Clinical Hypnosis, and a certified trainer of Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP). Carol is also a contributing author of The New Private Practice (W.W. Norton, 2001) as well as several research papers on hypnosis.

Visual images are the strongest forms of suggestions and that's the reason why visualization is so effective. When I ask you to imagine something, I’m actually programming your mind with whatever it is that I’d like you to imagine. If you’re still trying to figure out how a simple word like that can program your mind, consider this hypothetical scenario…


Thank you for the emails and the clips available for free here on your site. I’m a disabled veteran from Desert Storm. I fight daily just to get the healthcare I need. The VA doesn’t want to help anyone. I broke my back in three places. I lost my husband in 2005 when our son was 12 years old. Luckily, I have a wonderful son who tries his best for being a caretaker for me. I live in Florida and cannot afford to fly and take your class. I started a non profit to help out other veterans, it was going great and now it’s in a lull. I make less a month than people on Medicare get, I’m in the gap between making enough to take care of everything and too much to be eligible for Medicaid. I’ve been denied 5 times for Social Security Disability. I’d love to talk with you about how I can get someone in a trance on the phone to make donations. Could you email me at cupcakesconfidential @ gmail .com?
However, we still have one big problem. English is full of pronouns — words like he, she, and it. These are shortcuts that we use instead of writing out names over and over in each sentence. Humans can keep track of what these words represent based on context. But our NLP model doesn’t know what pronouns mean because it only examines one sentence at a time.
Carol Sommer is a licensed clinical counselor who has been teaching clinical hypnotherapy since 1984. She is a certified Hypnotherapist and Consultant with American Society of Clinical Hypnosis, and a certified trainer of Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP). Carol is also a contributing author of The New Private Practice (W.W. Norton, 2001) as well as several research papers on hypnosis.
In this video I demonstrate two touch inductions, one induction is getting arm catalepsy by gently raising the student's arm, suggesting they look at the back of their raise hand, and then gently tapping on the muscles in opposite directions, so tapping on the bottom of the forearm, then the top, then the left, then the right and repeating this as the arm becomes cataleptic and seems to become like wax. This is a very quick induction, it is also very easy to do and very good with people who are happy to be hypnotised but who display resistance. The first induction involves stillness, touch, focus and guiding attention and a rhythm of touching.
It would be difficult to find an area of scientific interest more beset by divided professional opinion and contradictory experimental evidence...No one can say whether hypnosis is a qualitatively unique state with some physiological and conditioned response components or only a form of suggestion induced by high motivation and a positive relationship between hypnotist and subject...T.X. Barber has produced "hypnotic deafness" and "hypnotic blindness", analgesia and other responses seen in hypnosis—all without hypnotizing anyone...Orne has shown that unhypnotized persons can be motivated to equal and surpass the supposed superhuman physical feats seen in hypnosis.[148]
Neuro-Linguistic Programming: "a model of interpersonal communication chiefly concerned with the relationship between successful patterns of behaviour and the subjective experiences (esp. patterns of thought) underlying them" and "a system of alternative therapy based on this which seeks to educate people in self-awareness and effective communication, and to change their patterns of mental and emotional behaviour."
In 1784, at the request of King Louis XVI, a Board of Inquiry started to investigate whether animal magnetism existed. Among the board members were founding father of modern chemistry Antoine Lavoisier, Benjamin Franklin, and an expert in pain control, Joseph-Ignace Guillotin. They investigated the practices of a disaffected student of Mesmer, one Charles d'Eslon (1750–1786), and though they concluded that Mesmer's results were valid, their placebo-controlled experiments using d'Eslon's methods convinced them that mesmerism was most likely due to belief and imagination rather than to an invisible energy ("animal magnetism") transmitted from the body of the mesmerist.
However, adjunct lecturer in linguistics Karen Stollznow describes Bandler's and Grinder's reference to such experts as namedropping. Other than Satir, the people they cite as influences did not collaborate with Bandler or Grinder. Chomsky himself has no association with NLP whatsoever; his original work was intended as theory, not therapy. Stollznow writes, "[o]ther than borrowing terminology, NLP does not bear authentic resemblance to any of Chomsky's theories or philosophies – linguistic, cognitive or political."[18]
Experiments by researcher Ernest Hilgard demonstrated how hypnosis can be used to dramatically alter perceptions. After instructing a hypnotized individual not to feel pain in his or her arm, the participant's arm was then placed in ice water. While non-hypnotized individuals had to remove their arm from the water after a few seconds due to the pain, the hypnotized individuals were able to leave their arms in the icy water for several minutes without experiencing pain.
This video is of a lower quality but I have included it as a bonus demonstration lecture here at the end of the course for those who may be interested in seeing more demonstrations because it shows a live example in front of an audience of hypnotising someone conversationally and how I utilise what I observe and how they respond to me, to the audience and to sounds around them.

You will realize that most of the time, the speeches of political leaders are devoid of any logic, full of ambiguity and vague slogans that serve no other purpose than to whet the emotions of the crowd. A logical leader who uses clear, unambiguous speech and does not stir up emotions of the people will never win any election anywhere. Take my word for it.
At first blush, this simply reproduced, spiral-bound book probably won't knock you off your feet. It is, however, a practical manual on how to use indirect (Ericksonian) language in hypnotherapy. With a little imagination and work, a user can find all sorts of applications in sales and business communcations and all sorts of persuasive and entertaining communcations.

Given a sound clip of a person or people speaking, determine the textual representation of the speech. This is the opposite of text to speech and is one of the extremely difficult problems colloquially termed "AI-complete" (see above). In natural speech there are hardly any pauses between successive words, and thus speech segmentation is a necessary subtask of speech recognition (see below). Note also that in most spoken languages, the sounds representing successive letters blend into each other in a process termed coarticulation, so the conversion of the analog signal to discrete characters can be a very difficult process.
Hear it from them, with over 25.000 students and people attending our courses from all over the world we have hundreds of testimonials, have a look at the happy faces. These students have completed the NLP training, Licensed NLP Practitioner and Licensed NLP Master Practitioner follow this link http://www.nlplifetraining.com/nlp-training/testimonials/photos
Hypnotic music became an important part in the development of a ‘physiological psychology’ that regarded the hypnotic state as an ‘automatic’ phenomenon that links to physical reflex. In their experiments with sound hypnosis, Jean-Martin Charcot used gongs and tuning forks, and Ivan Pavlov used bells. The intention behind their experiments was to prove that physiological response to sound could be automatic, bypassing the conscious mind.[155]

Conversational hypnosis is a communication strategy, where you utilize certain principles from hypnotic language in conversational interactions, especially interactions where you expect a certain "outcome". For example you want to sell something or you want to help solving a more therapeutic problem and in order to achieve this you communicate in a certain way.

Conversational hypnosis is when you use principles of hypnosis in normal conversations to speak to the subconscious mind. Conversational hypnosis skills increase your influencial power and help you steer conversations your way seemingly naturally. It is a powerful tool to winning negotiations and propagating conversations and usually does not include an explicit induction nor emergence.
This video is of a lower quality but I have included it as a bonus demonstration lecture here at the end of the course for those who may be interested in seeing more demonstrations because it shows a live example in front of an audience of hypnotising someone conversationally and how I utilise what I observe and how they respond to me, to the audience and to sounds around them.
NLP practitioners claim eye movement can be a reliable indicator for lie detection. In 2012, researchers tested this claim in a series of three studies. In the first study, the eye movements of participants who were telling the truth or lying did not match proposed NLP patterns. In the second study, one group was told about the NLP eye movement hypothesis while the control group was not. However, there was no significant difference between both groups after a lie detection test. In the third study, the eye movements of each group were coded at public press conferences. Again, there was no significant difference in eye movement between them.

Findings from randomized controlled trials support the use of various relaxation techniques for treating both acute and chronic pain, although 2 recent systematic reviews suggest that methodologic flaws may compromise the reliability of these findings. Randomized trials have shown hypnosis is valuable for patients with asthma and irritable bowel syndrome, yoga is helpful for patients with asthma, and tai chi helps to reduce falls and fear of falling in elderly people. Evidence from systematic reviews shows hypnosis and relaxation techniques are probably not of general benefit in stopping smoking or substance misuse or in treating hypertension.​hypertension.,​,


According to David Spiegel, a hypnotherapist and psychiatry professor at Stanford University, the primary effect of hypnosis is that it allows people to separate their physiological reactions from their psychological reactions. “Typically, when we're anxious about something, our bodies react to that,” he says. “Your muscles tense up, you may start to sweat, you breathe faster, and then you notice that, and you think, ‘Oh God, this is really bad,’ and then your body says, ‘Oh, now she’s feeling really bad.’ It’s kind of a snowball effect.” Hypnosis helps us to isolate our thoughts from our feelings, so to speak, so that we can think about what’s causing us stress without getting absorbed in our physical responses to that stress.

Signal recognition is a skill that you develop as you get more and more experience in hypnosis. There are many signals that people will exhibit as you’re speaking with them – remember, to process any new information, the person has to access their unconscious mind, and when they do that, there’s a little window where the critical factor has been bypassed and access is straight into the unconscious. These little windows are what you’re looking for as a hypnotist as the times to give your suggestions. We could give you a list of some of the signals to watch for, but it’s really experience that teaches you to see these subtle signals. Also, start being aware of your own signals, and that will prompt you to find them in others. Be aware of your physiology when someone is talking to you.
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Jump up ^ Muller Weitzenhoffer, André (1989). "Chapter 8 Ericksonian Hypnotism: The Bandler/Grinder Interpretation". The Practice of Hypnotism Volume 2: Applications of Traditional an Semi-Traditional Hypnotism. Non-Traditional Hypnotism (1st ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. pp. 304–5. ISBN 0-471-62168-4. I have chosen nominalization to explain what some of the problems are in Bandler and Grinder's linguistic approach to Ericksonian hypnotism. Almost any other linguistic concept used by these authors could have served equally well for the purpose of showing some of the inherent weaknesses in their treatment.

Tai chi is a gentle system of exercises originating from China. The best known example is the “solo form,” a series of slow and graceful movements that follow a set pattern. It is said to improve strength, balance, and mental calmness. Qigong (pronounced “chi kung”) is another traditional Chinese system of therapeutic exercises. Practitioners teach meditation, physical movements, and breathing exercises to improve the flow of Qi, the Chinese term for body energy.
Hypnosis is the induction of a deeply relaxed state, with increased suggestibility and suspension of critical faculties. Once in this state, sometimes called a hypnotic trance, patients are given therapeutic suggestions to encourage changes in behavior or relief of symptoms. For example, in a treatment to stop smoking, a hypnosis practitioner might suggest that the patient will no longer find smoking pleasurable or necessary. Hypnosis for a patient with arthritis might include a suggestion that the pain can be turned down like the volume of a radio.
Conversational hypnosis doesn't need the use of lots of complicated language patterns, it just needs an understanding of certain principles. What is needed is an understanding of what hypnosis is, both the state people call hypnosis and the act of doing hypnosis, and an understanding of trance. Next people need to know what makes individuals go into trance states, and what deepens trance. Once you know these areas you know what you need to do to conversationally guide people into any trance state, not just hypnosis, but love, excitement, happiness, relaxation, or any other trance state you can think of. You will end up using many of the hypnotic language techniques, but these will be happening spontaneously and used in a natural way that fits with what you are saying.
Milton Erickson (1901–1980), the founding president of the American Society for Clinical Hypnosis and a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, the American Psychological Association, and the American Psychopathological Association, was one of the most influential post-war hypnotherapists. He wrote several books and journal articles on the subject. During the 1960s, Erickson popularized a new branch of hypnotherapy, known as Ericksonian therapy, characterised primarily by indirect suggestion, "metaphor" (actually analogies), confusion techniques, and double binds in place of formal hypnotic inductions. However, the difference between Erickson's methods and traditional hypnotism led contemporaries such as André Weitzenhoffer to question whether he was practising "hypnosis" at all, and his approach remains in question.
Jump up ^ Lynn, Steven Jay; Green, Joseph P.; Kirsch, Irving; Capafons, Antonio; Lilianfeld, Scott O.; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Montgomery, Guy (October 2015). "Grounding hypnosis in science: The 'new' APA Division 30 definition of hypnosis as a step backward". American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis. 57 (4): 390–401. doi:10.1080/00029157.2015.1011472. PMID 25928778.
The term "hypnosis" comes from the ancient Greek word ύπνος hypnos, "sleep", and the suffix -ωσις -osis, or from ὑπνόω hypnoō, "put to sleep" (stem of aorist hypnōs-) and the suffix -is.[9][10] The words "hypnosis" and "hypnotism" both derive from the term "neuro-hypnotism" (nervous sleep), all of which were coined by Étienne Félix d'Henin de Cuvillers in 1820. These words were popularized in English by the Scottish surgeon James Braid (to whom they are sometimes wrongly attributed) around 1841. Braid based his practice on that developed by Franz Mesmer and his followers (which was called "Mesmerism" or "animal magnetism"), but differed in his theory as to how the procedure worked.
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